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Ultimate Guide to the TAG Heuer Monza

The Monza is a watch that has had two lives: it formed part of the TAG Heuer re-edition range in the early 2000s and was on sale for 5 years before being phased out. The Monza then returned in 2011 as a Limited Edition model- a different dial to the earlier model, but an identical case.

While a popular watch with buyers, the die-hard collectors always had a bit of a problem with the Series, because while the Heuer Monza of the mid-1970s was a loved part of Heuer’s Chronomatic range, that watch looks nothing like the Monza re-edition.

To further confuse matters, the watch that lent its design to the Monza actually came from the 1930s, a fact that TAG Heuer didn’t really publicise first time around, meaning that many people- yours truly included- thought that the Monza re-edition was based on the Heuer Camaro.

As you’ll see, the Monza is notable for the high-end versions of the watch- not just the Calibre 36 Chronograph models, but several Yellow Gold and Rose Gold versions.

Origins of the Monza

Above you see the 2000 Monza with its long-lost grandfather from the 1930s. You can read more about this early one-button chronograph here.

But to most Heuer collectors, the “Monza” is this watch below- a black PVD special edition of the Heuer Carrera.

The original Heuer Monza was launched in 1976 to mark Ferrari’s World Championship in 1975 with Niki Lauda and Clay Regazzoni, and was on sale until the early 1980s.

Heuer Monza

The first of the “new” Monza series released was the CR2111 you see above, available with a white or black dial. This first series did not have the Monza name on the dial- nor a TAG Heuer Logo- simply “Heuer”.

Interestingly, the second hand of the watch changed between the time that the catalogue photos were taken and  the time that the watch hit the shops- you will never see a CR2111 Monza with the sweeping second hand shown above.

TAG Heuer Monza

After the initial re-edition series, TAG Heuer continued with the Monza, adding both “Monza” and “TAG Heuer” to the dial, and introducing several new versions. Most notable in the Chronograph range were these two Gold Monzas- the first in Yellow Gold

…and the second in Rose Gold. Both watches had limited availability, with the Rose Gold being the one that I would go for- the yellow Gold version being, well, too yellow.

Monza Calibre 6

As the same time that the Monza got a TAG Heuer logo, a second version of the watch was announced- the Monza watch with the Automatic Calibre 6 (ETA 2895-1) movement.

While the watch had a similar case to  the Chronograph, the dial was a lot simpler, as you’d expect from a three-hand watch. Like other models in the Monza range, the Calibre 6 also came in a Rose Gold model, which you see below.

The dial on the Calibre 6 Rose Gold has a detailed “Flinque” effect on the dial, and detailed Clos de Paris finish on the 6 o’clock sub-dial.

Monza Calibre 36

Sitting on top of the Monza range was the Calibre 36 Chronograph, a special edition of the watch with the famous COSC El Primero movement. The Calibre 36 Monza also used a Flinque-finish on the dial, as well as having two distinct sub-dial patterns- the 3 and 9 o’clock registers having a square outline, while the 6 o’clock register had a circular outline.

Note also that the Calibre 36 Monza also uses a different design of Chronograph pusher than the standard Calibre 17 model (have to say, that I prefer the pushers on the Calibre 17) and has a sapphire caseback to show off the movement.

Finally, there was also a Rose Gold Calibre 36 Monza, which like the Calibre 6 version, had a highly detailed dial. While the mix of patterns is quite effective on the Calibre 6 watch, it all looks a little busy on the Chronograph- there is a lot going on, with different shapes for the sub-dials as well as two types of patterning on the dial.

 The Return of the Monza

In 2011 TAG Heuer re-released the Monza Calibre 36, this time with a 1930s- style dial. You can read more about the new Monza re-edition here.

The Second Return of the Monza

CR2080.FC6375 HEUER MONZA CAL. 17 - 40 YEARS OF MONZA SPECIAL EDITION - PR VIEW 2016At Baselworld 2016, TAG Heuer announced that the Monza would be brought back again- this time with a dial inspired by the 1976 original. you can read more about the new Monza here.

 

In Summary

The Monza is one of my favourite re-editions, and I have owned the black “Heuer” Monza watch since it was released in 2000. Interestingly, TAG Heuer CEO Jean-Christophe Babin told me in Basel that the Monza had always been a success with customers, but was a victim of the decision to reduce the number of mainstream TAG Heuer lines. In the end, it was either going to be the Monaco or the Monza that was dis-continued, and as much as I love the Monza, the right call was clearly made.

While loved by buyers, I do think that the Monza has suffered in the eyes of collectors because of its name. Looking back, it would have been easier to use a different name that hadn’t been used before,- almost without exception, the first thing that Heuer collectors will say about the watch is that it’s not a “real” re-edition of the Monza…that name “belonging” to the PVD Monza of the 1970s.

Despite this, the Monza is a beautiful series, and one that can be had today for good money: get in before people realise that you can buy a  mint-condition Heuer Monza from 2000 for a fraction of the price that today’s Calibre 36 version commands.

 

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Photos: TAG Heuer, Calibre 11

  • Fabrizio

    Hi David, thanks for this comprehensive post about the Monza: all too often these nice re-editions are overlooked but it's where most young (or should I say youngish?) collectors have begun.

    I fully agree that this one should have been called Camaro, but hey that's not been the hippest name in, say, the last 20 years?

    Still I by far prefer the Carrera as a re-edition as it's much closer to the original and has a classic style that really befits the model line name. And by the way if I remember it right the Monza was also the costliest of all re-editions, even surpassing the 2- or 3-subdial Monaco.

    Cheers.

    Fabrizio

  • carryondentist

    Great summary.

    I have a White / Silver dial Monza cal.36 and have to say it is a really nice watch. The Zenith movement adds a bit of credibility compared to the modular ones found in the majority of other re-editions. The display back adding to the appeal. I find it a little thick to wear as a dress watch, but it certainly has presence on the wrist.

    As far as naming goes, I just don't think Camaro has enough recognition outside the U.S. The Monza deserved to be a bigger sales hit, but it just makes it all the rarer for those that have one! At least it was more successful than the Autavia re-release.

    • admin

      Thanks Chris- you certainly have the Rolls Royce of the Monza line- I agree with you that the El Primero movement lifts the watch you have to another level. Monza owners unite!

  • Bård

    Great article. I found this page where the Calibre 6 version was picture in PVD coating. Didn`t know it existed in PVD?

    http://www.timeandgems.com/tag-heuer-mens-dlc-pvd

  • DC

    Thanks Bard- that's an aftermarket DLC finish rather than a "Factory" model- still looks good though!

    Cheers

    David

  • Kean

    Excellent overview and very usefull. As a newbie to the Heuer world (coming from IWC and Omega) and seeking to spend my piggy-bank I wondered what the difference is between the CR2111 and CR2110?

  • DC

    Thanks Kean.

    CR2111 has a white dial; CR2110 is black..that's the only difference

    dc

  • Kean

    David

    Thank you for the speedy reply. Would you be able to point me towards a site or share some of that extensive knowledge? I am interested in learning about the differences between the Heuer and the Tag Heuer particularly where the quality of the movements are concerned.

    Thanks in advance

    Kean

  • DC

    Kean,

    If you're talking about the 2000-1 white-dial Heuer Monza (CR2111) versus the 2002-3 white-dial TAG Heuer Monza (CR2114, then there is no difference in the movement- its a Calibre 17 (ETA 2894-2).

    If you're looking at the Calibre 36 model, then that has a superior movement- its based on the El Primero 400 from Zenith.

    David

  • Brian

    Looking to buy a Monza (new or used) – any reliable used retailers/vendors? In my search, I've come across models listed as "WR2110" – is this an actual model number, and if it is, what is the difference between the WR2110 and the CR2110?

    Thanks.

  • DC

    Hi Brian,

    WR2110 is the black-dial Calibre 6 watch shown in the post above- so CR2110 is the Chronograph; WR2110 is the watch.

    Cheers

  • Bard

    My mint Monza 150.501 is on the way. Even got the original helmet box. Can`t wait..

  • DC

    Cool- would love to see a photo

    dc

  • ML

    Great information and overview of the series. I've been searching for a cr2110, or cr2113 for ages, and there seem to be a few around on auction sites. I'm a little wary of parting with cash, just in case they are not genuine. Most have serial numbers. Is there any way of checking these online?

  • Paolo

    David,

    I've re-read this post over and over these past few days since the Monza caught my eye last week. Picked one up 7 hours ago, supposedly brand new from a jeweler in downtown Los Angeles (Karkour Fine Jewelry). I love the way the watch looks, but have a few concerns now:

    1. I've worn it since i picked it up (7 hours), during dinner it was about 3 minutes slow already.

    2. It seemed to have stopped completely now, not sure how to get it started again. I tried shaking, re-adjusting the time, even tried turning the crown to wind it (crown fully pushed in), but not sure how much winding to do since I didn't get the instructions (or original box since it was a display piece, supposedly the box was lost) and I don't want to ruin it.

    3. Face only says "HEUER", which leads me to believe this is the 2000 re-edition chronograph. Back however has the following etched: "HEUER MONZA RE-EDITION", then the HEUER Logo, CR2110 below that, then "N 3673" serial number I suppose. Finally at the very bottom it says "By TAGHeuer". From the pictures I've found online, the back never says "HEUER MONZA RE-EDITION".

    I got it for only $850 which is great, but i'm not sure now if it needs a service due to its age; which the jeweler is willing to do for me for the first 2 years. I assume this has the Calibre 17 movement; should I take it to a Tag Specialist instead to be certain its not ruined? I think I can exchange it, however, the only other version they have is the Calibre 6 TAGHeuer for the same price. Still a good deal it seems, but I really prefer to keep this one since you mentioned in another post that anything marked HEUER is more collectible.

    Your input would be greatly appreciated. And thanks again for having such a comprehensive post regarding Tag's. Now I need to figure out how to register it as well.

    Paolo

  • Calvin

    David,

    I really love your website. Exciting to know the history of Tag Heuer.
    I personally own a CR5111 bought it few years ago.
    I find these from a website that seems to be a Monza from 1975. It is quite similar to the Monza you put in this page as the first version.
    This page is in Japanese but you can see the pictures at the bottom. http://cool-auction.net/cool-store/1975%E5%B9%B4%
    Is this different from the black PVD special edition of the Heuer Carrera you mentioned in this page?

    Calin

  • DC

    Hi Calvin,

    That watch has a Calculator dial placed inside the case of a 70s Heuer Monza- not the real deal.

    dc

  • Paolo

    David,

    Thanks for the response. I'll e-mail you a picture of my case back shortly. Anyway, turns out a screw fell off from somewhere inside the watch; I took it to Feldmans in Los Angeles where they found and reattached the screw and resynchronized the watch. Total of $85 and my watch has been perfect for a few months now, not even gaining or losing any time every day.

    Anyway, thanks again for everything and the great website.

    Paolo

  • DC

    Thanks Paolo,

    Got your photo and all looks normal.

    David

  • Elias Micael

    Sorry , pls correect my last query should have addressed to you DC not to Calvin .

    Apologies ,

    Mike

  • DC

    Hi Mike- think we lost your original message- apologies

    dc

  • DC,

    I have found your website SOOO captivating, your reviews so comprehensive and your knowledge invaluable. I have a number of Tag’s I have purchased from AD’s and have recently become completely enamored with the Monza CR2110. As this is no longer a watch I can find locally I have been looking to ebay and Chrono24. I have been watching this item, and though it has no papers or provenance to speak of all the visual tells I can take in tell me it’s real. HOWEVER, I have never seen a rotor on the back of one as it is not an exhibition case and while stamped with the correct ETA number the colouration of the Rotor has me concerned. It ends soon and I thought I would take a chance just seeing what you thought of it. Thanks in advance. http://www.ebay.com/itm/TAG-HEUER-Monza-CR-2110-Chronograph-Watch-Black-Stainless-NR-100-AUTHENTIC-/300835278552?pt=Wristwatches&hash=item460b2e0ed8 is the item in question.

  • Hi Tim,

    Thanks for the kind words and sorry for the delay- Yes, that one looks the same as my Monza, so you should be OK.

    I've never had the back off mine, but the rest matches up…love this watch.

    David

  • KJ

    Hi David,

    Thanks for the article and interesting chronology!

    I'm curious with the Calibre 6 used in Stainless Steel (WR2110) vs Rose Gold Edition (WR5140).

    I came by the Rose Gold edition on eBay and I noted the caseback actually stated "Chronometer", whereas caseback on WR2110 doesn't have it.

    Rose Gold caseback:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Tag-Heuer-Monza-Calibre-6

    WR2110 caseback:
    .

    Your insight on why the difference is much appreciated 🙂

    Thanks.

    KJ

  • Hi KJ,

    Same base movement in both watches, but the Rose Gold version has the upgraded components and COSC certification- so the standard watch is not a Chronometer, but the Rose Gold version is.

    David

  • KJ

    Thanks David.

    Btw, I just received a new (to me) WR2110 in a DHL package today. Here's a quick sharing I posted on WUS, just to share 😀

    http://forums.watchuseek.com/f25/tag-heuer-monza-

  • Quentin

    Hello David,
    Great site! Everyone here seems to be able to contribute a wealth of information!
    I am looking for a nice pre-owned Monza CR2113 but am very hesitant to buy on ebay, even though… given all the info I have acquired through folks like all of you…some of the watches look quite genuine!
    The thing is…all of the TAG Authorized E-Retailers only seem to present the current TAG model range and most are using the Stock TAG marketing Page to display their range.
    Can anyone recommend a place to go that I can feel reasonable safe that I am getting the genuine article?
    Thanks you for any an all assistance.

  • hatster

    Really useful post as I am considering buying a CR2111. It comes boxed but no papers. As an uninitiated buyer, is there anything else I should be looking for?

    • calibre11

      No too many decent replicas of these, but you;re right to be cautious. If you find one you like, try posting a photo at forums.calibre11.com and we’ll try and help you out!

  • Marc Prentice

    Where does this model come into it CR2114.FC61 ? have you got information on this i have been looking at a used one but trying to find more on the model, great guide here but no reference to CR2114

    • calibre11

      Hi. That reference is effectively CR2111 featured on page 2, but with a TAG Heuer logo instead of Heuer.

      Here it is in the 2002/ 3 Catalogue

      • Marc Prentice

        Hi thanks for info, im close to buying one but there is option of CR2111 which is same condition and very similar price, unsure which one to go for, what would you go for : ) ? is the CR2114 any more desirable or hold more value ?

        • calibre11

          I’ve got the Heuer version which I love…but I don’t see any evidence of a price premium for either model

      • Marc Prentice

        also so the CR2110 was released 2000 and the CR2114 20022003 ? is this correct ? just seems strange the re-issue so close to each other with only the heuertag logo being the difference ? thanks

        • calibre11

          LVMH bought TAG Heuer in 1999 (the first model was already signed off) and changed the strategy to use only a single brand- TAG Heuer. The Carrera also switched to TAG Heuer logos and the Autavia in 2003 was released as a TAG Heuer.

          Yes, the only difference is Heuer vs. TAG Heuer

  • Bernd F

    Hi, i’d like to know whether the CR2111 and the Calibre 36 “El Primero” really share the same housing. I had both on my wrist (not at the same time, but the CR2111 in white and the El Primero with black dial), and I think the El Primero appears bigger, altough it was black. In the shop I was told that the El Primero has a 40mm case. The internet tells me the CR2111 has a 38mm case…..

    Personally I would prefer a CR2111 but it is so hard to find in Germany/Luxembourg/Belgium.
    And many thanks for this great site dedicated to the Monza!
    Regards,
    Bernd

    • Hi Bernd,

      The Calibre 36 and 17 movements are almost the same size (30mm diameter vs. 28.6mm respectively), so the case wouldn’t need to be any bigger…I can’t confirm for you, but I would expect them to be the same size.

      • Bernd F

        Thanks for your reply. I have now found a CR2111 that is for sale (private seller). Can you please help me with the following issues:
        – did the CR2111 have sapphire or mineral glass?
        – is it true that this model is limited to 2500 or 5000 pcs (I do find different sources for this) and are the watches numbered?
        – do you happen to know the max wrist size for the standard strap?
        Thanks in advance,
        Bernd

        • – Sapphire Crystal
          – I don’t believe they are a limited edition- at least, not a numbered one
          – I’ve never heard of the standard strap not being large enough for someone..don’t know what size they’ll work for, but given its a deployant strap, you can basically let it out the whole way

          dc